Friday, November 21, 2014

My poem, "Phylum," published in The Common

Was delighted to receive copies of The Common yesterday with my poem "Phylum" in them! This poem has footnotes and it was laid out perfectly. AND I received a check for my work! Thanks to John Hennessy, poetry editor, and to everyone at this superb poetry journal!

Monday, November 17, 2014

Cervena Barva Press announces Victory Over the Sun translated by Larissa Shmailo

Cervena Barva Press announces "Victory Over the Sun"
The First Futurist Opera by Aleksei Kruchenykh
Translated by Larissa Shmailo; edited and with an introduction by Eugene Ostashevsky

"Victory over the Sun, one of the most important events in Russian Futurism and in the avant-garde in general, is not well recognized in the West. Now in a new edition of Larissa Shmailo's brilliant translation of the text, with a lively introduction by Eugene Ostashevsky, readers can appreciate the significance and innovativeness of the 1913 play. Using Shmailo's translation and Malevich's pathbreaking stage designs, the play was reconstructed and staged in 1980 to great acclaim and remains a signal accomplishment in the history of the avant-garde."
—Gerald Janecek, Author of Zaum: The Transrational Poetry of Russian Futurism (UCSD, 1996) and Sight and Sound Entwined (Berghahn Books, 2000)

"Velimir Khlebnikov, literally, missed the train on co-penning this one, contributing only a poem to Kruchenykh's libretto. Staged alongside Mayakovsky's Vladimir Mayakovsky, A Tragedy, the 1913 original production of Victory is remembered primarily for Kazimir Malevich's costumes, lighting, and set design, instigations for the Suprematism and Constructivism still to come in 1915 and 1919, respectively…. Nothing is more fitting for this centennial of "Russian Futurianism" than a celebration of Kruchenykh's great contribution to poetry, his Zaum, and not just for its verbal play – the inventive neologizing and the épater-le-bourgeois utopianism – but for the underappreciated antilyricism of his verse, as well. In communicating to us his musicality in English, Larissa Shmailo has done a remarkable job in conferring on Kruchenykh his true due as a poet." —Alex Cigale, Translations Editor of MadHat Lit

"A century ago, Aleksei Kruchenykh was the way out writer's most way out writer. If publishing today, he still would be."
—Richard Kostelanetz, Author of A Dictionary of the Avant-Gardes (Routledge, 1993)

http://www.thelostbookshelf.com/cervenabooks.html
#Victory over the Sun
$16.00 | ISBN: 978-0-692-30231-6 | 56 Pages

Sunday, November 16, 2014

Text of Tarkovsky translation of "June 25, 1939" with Russian

June 25, 1939
Arseny Tarkovsky
Tr. L. Shmailo

It's frightening to die, and such a shame to leave
This captivating riffraff that enchants me,
The stuff so dear to poets, so very lovely,
I never celebrated; it somehow wasn't to be.
I loved to come back home at the break of dawn
And shift my things around in half an hour.
I loved the white windowsill, and also the flower,
The carved faceted glass, and also the water,
And the heavens, greenish-azure in their color—
And that I was a poet and a wicked man.
And when every June came with my birthday again
I'd idolize that holiday, bustling
With verses by friends and congratulations from women,
With crystal laughter, and gay glasses clinking
And the lock of that hair, unique, individual
And that kiss, so entirely inevitable.
But now at home it’s all set up differently;
It's June and I no longer have that homesickness.
In this way, life is teaching me patience,
And turbid, my blood now is stirring this birthday,
And a secret anxiety is tormenting me—
What have I done with my great destiny,
Oh my God, what have I done with me!

25 июня 1939 года
Арсений Тарковский
И страшно умереть, и жаль оставить
Всю шушеру пленительную эту,
Всю чепуху, столь милую поэту,
Которую не удалось прославить
Я так любил домой прийти к рассвету,
И в полчаса все вещи переставить,
Еще любил я белый подоконник,
Цветок и воду, и стакан граненый,
И небосвод голубизны зеленой,
И то, что я — поэт и беззаконник.
А если был июнь и день рожденья
Боготворил я праздник суетливый,
Стихи друзей и женщин поздравленья,
Хрустальный смех и звон стекла счастливый,
И завиток волос неповторимый,
И этот поцелуй неотвратимый
. Расставлено все в доме по-другому,
Июнь пришел, я не томлюсь по дому,
В котором жизнь меня терпенью учит
И кровь моя мутится в день рожденья,
И тайная меня тревога мучит,—
Что сделал я с высокою судьбою,
О боже мой, что сделал я с собою!

Thursday, November 13, 2014

New translation of Arseny Tarkovsky and poems by Alexander Skidan up at TRUCK

I have a spanking brand new translation of "June 25, 1939" by Arseny Tarkovsky and several poems by Alexander Skidan translated by me and the author up at Halvard Johnson's TRUCK today. Thanks to "driver," poet and translator Anny Ballardini, for including me! http://halvard-johnson.blogspot.it/2014/11/larissa-shmailo_13.html?showComment=1415892154893

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

BLAZEVOX IS PUBLISHING MY NOVEL, PATIENT WOMEN

Blazevox is PUBLISHING MY NOVEL, PATIENT WOMEN!!! Stunned with happiness for an hour and now dancing around the house! THANK YOU to the brilliant Geoffrey Gatza for publishing my first collection of poetry, In Paran, and now this novel, which takes place in the Woodstock and punk rock and early AIDS eras, culminating in the heyday of the 12 Step programs in the 90s (meet my protagonist Nora, and her sponsor, the transgender Chrisis St. Lawrence). God, it's been a pretty good day, week, month, life!

Sunday, November 09, 2014

Patient Women a Subito Press Contest Semifinalist

Thanks to Subito Press of the University of Colorado Boulder for naming my novel, Patient Women, as a semifinalist in their prose contest. (Hint: this does mean that Patient Women still needs a publisher, friends; ideas?)

Friday, November 07, 2014

Cover of my translation of Victory over the Sun by Aleksei Kruchenykh from ‪Červená Barva Press

Advanced in the Guggenheim Fellowship Competition!

The Guggenheim Fellowship Competition has requested work samples from me. I am sending my books ‪#‎special‬ characters (Unlikely Books), In Paran (Blazevox), and A Cure for Suicide (Červená Barva Press). I am honored and would like to thank my publishers

My translation of A. Kruchenykh's Victory over the Sun now available from Červená Barva Press

I am thrilled to announce the publication of my translation of Aleksei Kruchenykh's libretto of the first Russian Futurist opera, Victory over the Sun (1913). Published by Gloria Mindock's Červená Barva Press, this edition has a brilliant introduction by Eugene Ostashevsky. This publication would not have been possible without the help of Alexander Cigale. who, with scholars Gerald Janacek and Richard Kostelanetz, have provided wonderful blurbs for the book. Cover art is from Kazimir Malevich's set designs for the original production. Thanks to everyone who has made this publication possible, and to the Garage Museum of Moscow for using this translation for their reconstruction of the opera!

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Career Narrative

Larissa Shmailo is the editor-in-chief of the anthology Twenty-first Century Russian Poetry (featured on the Poetry Foundation's Harriet, Voice of Russia, and Russia Beyond the Headlines), poetry editor for MadHat Annual, and founder of The Feminist Poets in Low-Cut Blouses. She translated Victory over the Sun for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art landmark reconstruction of the multimedia avant-garde opera and has been a translator on the Bible in Russia for the Eugene A. Nida Institute for Biblical Scholarship of the American Bible Society. Larissa has studied poetry and translation with Annie Finch, Bob Holman, and Pierre Joris. Her studies in prosody, metrics, and scansion are recorded and published by Annie Finch on her websites. Larissa has published critical work on Elaine Equi and Philip Nikolayev.

Larissa's translation of the Russian opera Victory over the Sun by A. Kruchenych will be part of the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art's retrospective of Russia performative art, Russian Performance: A Cartography of Its History. The libretto of this opera is included in collections of the New York Museum of Modern Art, the Hirsshorn Museum, the Museum of Natural History in New York City, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and others. The opera has been performed at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, CalArts, and internationally. This translation is taught at universities nationwide. The print publication of this libretto with an introduction by Eugene Ostashevsky is pending by Červená Barva Press. The translation is currently featured on the Brooklyn Rail InTranslation site at http://intranslation.brooklynrail.org/russian/victory-over-the-sun

Larissa's work has appeared or is forthcoming in the Random House anthology of metrical verse Measure for Measure, the Penguin anthology Words for the Wedding, Plume, The St. Petersburg Review, Jacket, Jacket2, The Battersea Review, Gargoyle, Barrow Street, Drunken Boat, Fulcrum, The Unbearables Big Book of Sex, Contemporary Russian Poetry, Rattapallax, About: Poetry.com, and hundreds of journals, zines, websites, blogs, and other media/publications. Her poetry has been included in 50 anthologies. Larissa's poetry books are #specialcharacters (Unlikely Books), (BlazeVOX [books]), A Cure for Suicide (Cervena Barva Press), Fib Sequence (Argotist Ebooks). Her poetry CDs are The No-Net World and Exorcism.

Larissa’s work is archived at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Hirsshorn Museum of the Smithsonian, and eight universities. She received honorable mention in the Compass Award for Russian literary translation in 2011, the Elizabeth P. Braddock poetry prize in 2012, and the Goodreads May 2012 poetry contest; she was a finalist in the Glass Woman prose prize in 2012. Larissa also received the New Century Music awards for best spoken word with rock, jazz, and electronica in 2009, as well as the best album award for Exorcism. She received Critic’s Pick notices from Time Out Magazine for her reading series Sliding Scale Poetry and Critic’s Pick, The New York Press, for “Deconstructing Education,” The New School in 1996. She was a Radio Highlight, New York Times, for “Madwoman,” Teachers and Writers Collaborative Radio in 1996.

Larissa also translated the Bibliography of the Translations of the Bible in the Languages of the Russian Federation, Commonwealth of Independent States, and Baltic States, by Dr. Boris Arapovic for the Nida Institute on Biblical Scholarship’s History of Bible Translation series (of the American Bible Society; publication pending. Her translations of Yuri Arabov and Anya Logvinova appear in Contemporary Russian Poetry (Dalkey Archive Press); funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, 2007. She received honorable mention in the Compass Award for literary translation, 2011 sponsored by Princeton, Georgetown, and Montclair State Universities, Cardinal Points Journal, and other institutions.

Larissa has read at the Knitting Factory, Barnard College, the New School, New York University, the Langston Hughes residence, the Bowery Poetry Club, and for American Express/Share Our Strength. Her work has been heard on PennSound Radio, New York Board of Education radio, Teachers and Writers Collaborative radio, Columbia University radio, WBAI, Indiefeed Performance Poetry, and many other broadcasts. She is founder of The Feminist Poets in Low-Cut Blouses poetry group, curator of the Sliding Scale Poetry Reading Series, and a member of the Unbearables and Otherstream literary groups. She has organized and performed in poetry benefits on behalf of human services and literacy organizations, including The Bread and Life Soup Kitchen, Girls Write Now, and the New York City Poetry Calendar. She is the former director of TWiN East Coast, an international Internet network of poets. She has been a curator of the Spirit of Howl! Festival, a spokesperson for NEA funding, and a member of the advisory Board of the NYC Poetry Calendar.

Critical Commentary
I see [Shmailo's] work as a continuum in a long tradition of radical writing practices from Futurism, to Dada, to Oulipo, to Pussy Riot. Read it when you wish to be empowered. Read it when you wish to be entertained. Read it to rid yourself of the precious and polite.
—Elaine Equi

Larissa is constitutionally predetermined to sing out in her lines. The notes stick in your head. She hails from all over the place and brings a unique poetic worldview, her eyes filled with life and love, pain and death, freedom and coercion, the real of the mind and the imagined of the heart. . .When it comes to capturing the intimacy of pain, Larissa Shmailo is among the most daring poets of her generation. When speaking of human rights, she is a human flame. She is subtle and provocative, fresh and out of bounds. You will fall in love here, and you will be loved right back.
—Philip Nikolayev

Her poems, alive with discomfort and broken pieces, teach an art of compassion without illusion.
— Robert Viscusi

In a sea of mimics, this poet is an original voice.
—Doug Holder

Shmailo has managed to split language into its common & least common denominators/principles: sound, meaning, symbol, feeling (text/ure) as well as providing us with a range of voices from child to adult & male to female within a range of styles & mannerisms from the ultra-experimental to quirky ―innocent‖ rhymes like her sexy riff on ―the 12 days of Christmas‖ in her classic ―The Other Woman’s Cunt.‖ Her knowledge of the ―WORD‖ & how to use it extends from darkly humorous to warm, lyrical, tender & painful . . .
—Steve Dalachinsky

Shmailo's poetry sucked me into/out of its golden spiral.
—Moira Richards, Cape Times (South Africa)

"MIRROR, or a Flash in the Pan" . . . is very close to fiction, although it certainly has passages of poetry. It's an excellent piece, crystal clear and shockingly honest . . .Shmailo's most famous (popular?) poem . . . "The Other Woman's Cunt". . . is angry, raunchy, vicious and by the way! hilarious. There is a fair amount of typographical experimentation and deep connections to literature and mythology, but at its heart, as a whole, the [work] has the remarkable quality of being extremely moving even when you aren't sure what's going on.
—Meredith Sue Willis, Books for Readers

New work

Pleased to have work forthcoming in FULCRUM, Plume, St. Petersburg Review, The Common, and Measure for Measure, the new Random House anthology of metrical verse.

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Upcoming appearances

Saturday, September 27
Dream Traveler:
100 Thousand Poets for Change in New York City
@ Sidewalk
94 Avenue A
New York, New York 10009
6:00 pm EST

Sunday, September 28
@MadHat at the Dumbo Arts Festival
Berl's Poetry Shop
126A Front St
Brooklyn, New York 11209
2:00 pm EST

Monday, September 29
@Saturn Series and Open Mic
Café Mania
443 3 RD AVENUE
New York, New York 10016
8:00 pm EST

Friday, October 10th
Women Write Resistance
@Purdue University Northwest
YJean Chambers Theater
Student Union Library building.
(Reception to follow in Founders Hall)
6:00–7:30 pm CST

Saturday October 11
Women Write Resistance
@Indiana Writers’ Consortium
2014 Creative Writing Conference and Book Fair
Hilton Garden Inn, Salon A
7775 Mississippi Street
Merrillville, Indiana
4:00–5:10 pm CST

Monday, October 13
Chicago Calling Festival
@Molly Malone's Reading Series and Open Mic
7652 W. Madison
Forest Park, Illinois
7:00–9:30 pm CST

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Dream Traveler: 100 Thousand Poets for Change in New York City

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Dream Traveler: 100 Thousand Poets for Change in New York City

Media Contacts:
Larissa Shmailo
(212) 712-9865
slidingsca@aol.com

Ron Kolm
(718) 721-0946
kolmrank@verizon.net
@ Sidewalk
94 Avenue A, New York, New York 10009
Saturday, September 27, 6–8 pm

New York City: September 27 marks the fourth annual global event of 100 Thousand Poets for Change, a grassroots movement that brings poets, artists, and musicians together worldwide to call for environmental, social, and political change within the framework of peace and sustainability. There are over 500 events planned worldwide.

The flagship reading in New York City is Dream Traveler, the surrealist vision of noted Romanian poet Valery Oisteanu, co-curated and organized by the leader of the Unbearables literary clan, Ron Kolm. The readers represent New York's literati, and are Kolm, Larissa Shmailo, Tom Walker Gordon Gilbert, Claudia Serea, Allan Graubard, Jeff Wright, Ronnie Norpel, Carl Watson, Ilka Scobie, David St-Lascaux, Jordan Zinovich, Bill Wolak, Max Blagg, Tom Savage. Angelo Verga,Thad Rutkowski, Shelley Miller, Kelvin Dale, and Wanda Phipps.

All are welcome to attend or organize a 100 Thousand Poets, Musicians, Artists, Photographers, and/or Mimes event. Those who want to get involved may visit www.100tpc.org to find an event near them or sign up to organize an event in their area.

Stanford University recognizes 100 Thousand Poets for Change as an historical event, the largest poetry reading in history, and preserves documentation of its readings and other events in that university's archives.

About 100 Thousand Poets for Change
Co-Founder Michael Rothenberg (walterblue@bigbridge.org) is a widely known poet, editor of the online literary magazine Bigbridge.org, and an environmental activist based in Northern California. Co-Founder Terri Carrion is a poet, translator, photographer, and editor and visual designer for BigBridge.org.
100 Thousand Poets for Change
P.O. Box 870
Guerneville, CA 95446
Phone: (305) 753-4569
www.100TPC.org

Wednesday, September 03, 2014

Mission to Moscow

Friends, I am deeply honored and delighted to tell you that the Garage Museum in Moscow has selected my English translation of Victory over the Sun to use in its new reconstruction of this avant-garde opera for a sweeping retrospective of Russian performative art from 1913 to the present. I'm going to Moscow!

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

My Dead

My husband lost his shirt at cards; insolvent, he then drowned
in slick Cancun on our honeymoon; years now, it still astounds
how fast, how fast, a living hell can turn a life around.

My godchild told me pointedly if she were to attempt
to die that she'd succeed at once, a word that doctor kept,
and took a hundred opiates and drifted to her death.

My punk rock pimp, a crush of mine, loved theater and art.
He sodomized and strangled a young man who broke his heart,
then packed a bag of bondage toys and left for foreign parts.

Before her death, my mother called and calmly sat me down;
if she could do it all again, she'd have no children, none.
She lived her life in anger and, despite us, all alone.

My father drank and slept around; he was a well-liked guy.
He said I love you once to me the night before he died
Was that a feeling come too late, or panic in his eyes?

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Late Summer Poem

You must have seen it, at a crepuscule shore;
It strikes as lightning does, trembling the sky,
with dying rose and aster glowing, calling "more"
to the last flash of egret possibility.

You must have heard it: mad crickets in the dusk,
the flap of lone water on smooth stone and bark,
the sound of a loon in the thick summer musk,
the breath of the mango tree whispering in the dark.

Self-centered, we cannot see God in ourselves,
and in others we overlook and miss the divine;
in nature, not ours, we sense eternal lives
for a moment alive in our chattering minds.

Thursday, August 21, 2014

The Girl @theParisReview Says Uncool

The idiot girl @theParisReview says uncool:
that, to critique, the phrase, the trappings of,
is used by “100% pretentious hacks.” And
the editor @PoetryFound retweets her crap,
and an article on pooping, besides. I was
going to tweet a Baudelaire, from “Beauty,” line,
line by displaced line:
I am beautiful, o mortals, like a dream of stone
But thought better of it (a proscribed phrase?)
—an unpretentious #Stalinist might
tell me not to translate, or Baudelaire not to write.
(But what does this mean:
Je hais le mouvement qui déplace les lignes?
Is the idiot girl @ParisCool right?) No, she is
an idiot, disliking a history without her part,
as I dislike the way the young are heartless, mean,
calling it honest (and I was different @18?)

This poem originally appeared in Gargoyle.

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Larissa Shmailo's poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in the Penguin anthology Words for the Wedding, the Brooklyn Rail, The Unbearables Big Book of Sex, Barrow Street, Fulcrum, Drunken Boat, Gargoyle, Cardinal Points, Lungfull, Big Bridge, Rattapallax, and About: Poetry. She was the winner of the 2009 New Century Music Awards for spoken word with music for her CD Exorcism; her first CD, The No-Net World, is heard frequently on radio and the Internet. Larissa's books of poetry are In Paran (BlazeVox) and A Cure for Suicide (Cervena Barva Press). Read her new e-book, Fib Sequence (Argotist Ebooks) at http://www.lulu.com/product/ebook/fib-sequence/16347718 (free download).

Larissa translated the original English-language libretto of the Russian zaum opera Victory over the Sun performed at the Brooklyn Academy of Music; it is archived at the Smithsonian, the Los Angeles County Museum (LACMA), and the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA). Most recently, she received honorable mention in the international translators' competition for the 2011 Compass Award sponsored by Princeton University. Larissa translated a bibliography of Bible translations in the languages of the Russian Empire for the American Bible Society and contributed to the anthology Contemporary Russian Poetry published by Dalkey Archive Press.

Read Larissa Shmailo's new e-book, Fib Sequence, from Argotist Ebooks, FREE, at this link: http://www.lulu.com/product/ebook/fib-sequence/16347718

Larissa blogs at http://larissashmailo.blogspot.com

And buy books and CDs and digital recordings here (so gratefully appreciated):
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=shmailo&x=0&y=0